The Combat Collection – The New Indian Express

Express press service

KOCHI: Last month, Capcom released an optimized and curated showcase of ten of its popular vintage arcade games as part of the “Capcom Fighting Collection.” Capcom’s fighting games date back decades and are an important part of video game history, having been widely played in arcades in the late 90s. This collection contains Street Fighter 2, Red Earth, the Vampire hunter/Darkstalker series and a few other wandering fighting games that feature recurring characters from all of these games.

I have to give credit to Capcom for their efficient translation of arcade games into a modern console format. For example, we can now change very grainy pixel graphics and make them smoother, or even change the aspect ratio for gameplay. The most notable of the customization options is customizing your buttons for special combos and options to lower the difficulty. These aren’t groundbreaking changes, but very thoughtful updates provided by Capcom, given that these games are coin-operated arcade games originally.

Capcom has also introduced an online game mode where you can be matched with other players on the same platform. Being constantly beaten by the AI ​​on Street Fighter 2, I haven’t had the courage to try the online mode yet. The current collection is available for PC, PlayStation, Nintendo Switch, and Xbox. I played them myself on the Switch and recommend playing these games with a controller rather than a keyboard/mouse.

My favorite from the collection is “Red Earth”, aka “War-Zard”. Red Earth only features 4 playable characters – but each of these characters has their own story, with different cutscenes that lay out the story for them. The game also spawns monster enemies, making every battle a kind of boss battle. The progression in the offline mode was quite different compared to the rest of the collection.

“Super Gem Fighter” and “Cyberbots” were also visually fun, with interesting animations resulting from the combined moves. I also liked “Puzzle Fighter” because I could win it without breaking a sweat. As a tetris-like puzzle game, it’s the only non-combat game in the series. I like that the collection also has a “museum” in the menu, which gives us access to the original art from these games. This gives an idea of ​​how elaborately these games were designed at the time. It’s easy to rate this collection with a 7/10 – I enjoyed playing most of them.

KOCHI: Last month, Capcom released an optimized and curated showcase of ten of its popular vintage arcade games as part of the “Capcom Fighting Collection.” Capcom’s fighting games date back decades and are an important part of video game history, having been widely played in arcades in the late 90s. This collection contains Street Fighter 2, Red Earth, the Vampire hunter/Darkstalker series and a few other wandering fighting games that feature recurring characters from all of these games. I have to give credit to Capcom for their efficient translation of arcade games into a modern console format. For example, we can now change very grainy pixel graphics and make them smoother, or even change the aspect ratio for gameplay. The most notable of the customization options is customizing your buttons for special combos and options to lower the difficulty. These aren’t groundbreaking changes, but very thoughtful updates provided by Capcom, given that these games are coin-operated arcade games originally. Capcom has also introduced an online game mode where you can be matched with other players on the same platform. Being constantly beaten by the AI ​​on Street Fighter 2, I haven’t had the courage to try the online mode yet. The current collection is available for PC, PlayStation, Nintendo Switch, and Xbox. I played them myself on the Switch and recommend playing these games with a controller rather than a keyboard/mouse. My favorite from the collection is “Red Earth”, aka “War-Zard”. Red Earth only features 4 playable characters – but each of these characters has their own story, with different cutscenes that lay out the story for them. The game also spawns monster enemies, making every battle a kind of boss battle. The progression in the offline mode was quite different compared to the rest of the collection. “Super Gem Fighter” and “Cyberbots” were also visually fun, with interesting animations resulting from the combined moves. I also liked “Puzzle Fighter” because I could win it without breaking a sweat. As a tetris-like puzzle game, it’s the only non-combat game in the series. I like that the collection also has a “museum” in the menu, which gives us access to the original art from these games. This gives an idea of ​​how elaborately these games were designed at the time. It’s easy to rate this collection with a 7/10 – I enjoyed playing most of them.